The ABC’s of Facial Fillers

Although they are already part of the beauty routine of many, there are some that need help understanding what facial fillers can do for you. Here you go!

October 12, 2017 —

Miami, FL, October 6, 2017- Although they are already part of the beauty routine of millions of men and women, facial fillers are not well understood throughout the population. Consumers are still calling all injectable fillers ‘botox’ and don’t know about their multiple functions in the aesthetic world.

There is so much that can be done with injectables now.  There are incredible techniques and the service menu options have increased dramatically says Joey Chancis, founder of The LABB Aesthetic Beauty Bar, www.botoxlabb.com. The LABB specializes in cosmetic treatments and injectables and has locations in Florida and Los Angeles, California.

Chancis, together with Jennifer Leebow, Nurse Practitioner at The LABB, gives the general rundown of the main products used in the cosmetic market. They talk about the product makeup, the techniques applied to each one and the results they each yield.

Chancis adds that these types of treatments are to better the appearance. They can do anything from soften expression lines or wrinkles, volumize lips, eliminate under-eye bags, or start preventative procedures on younger patients.

Juvederm Ultra and Ultra Plus: Lasts 9-12 months. Used to add moderate volume in the areas of the cheeks and lips.

Volbella: Lasts 9-12 months. It is less dense and adds less volume than Juvederm. Used to eliminate smile/frown lines and smoker’s lines. Oftentimes, it is used to add very subtle volume to the lips.

Vollure: Lasts up to 18 months. This product was recently approved by the FDA. It has the same density as Juvederm, with more duration. It is ideal for the patients that are satisfied with their treatments and would like to make them more permanent.

Voluma: Lasts up to two years. This is the densest product and is used in the larger areas that require volume and elasticity. It is ideal for the cheek area, as it offers an instant lift.

Age, Errors, and Cost

Experts say that the adequate age to start injectable treatments varies from person to person. The genetic makeup, the lifestyle, and personal preference play a role in the condition of the skin and the aesthetic “needs” that the patient might have.

Leebow says that Millenials don’t want to resort to plastic surgery, but with the excess of photos and selfies taken, they care about how they look. The LABB’s recommendation is that they start treating themselves from an earlier age, so they can prevent the sagging of the skin.

She explains that these injectables not only lift, soften and contour the face, but they delay and avoid the breaking of collagen in the skin. Like all treatments, it is of utmost importance to hire certified professionals with experience that are using FDA-approved products.

Chancis reassures by saying that the risk is minimal, so long as the patient has realistic expectations. The LABB team takes the time to talk to and educate their patients so they understand what they need. They do not inject if it is not necessary. The team is looking for symmetry and the best natural result possible.

Contact Info:
Name: Joey Chancis
Email: joey@joeynewyork.com
Phone: (305)934-1391
Organization: The LABB

Source: MM-prReach

Release ID: 249762

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